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37. The Logan House

This house was built about 1840 by a Mr. Harper, who had built it for a fiance who died.

Harper was unwilling to live in the house, and sole it to surveyor and lawyer James H. Logan in the 1850s. It still remains in the hands of his descendants.

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It is known for its use as a hospital during the Civil War and as the site of the first amputation behind Confederate lines. Following the Federal attack on Philippi, one of the wounded Confederate soldiers, Captain Leroy Barker Daingerfield, was brought to Beverly. Dr. John Taylor Huff, a Confederate doctor was brought from Philippi to perform the needed amputation. Having lost all of his instruments in the attack, Dr. Huff performed the operation here on June 4, 1861, using a butcher knife and tenon saw. The young captain made an uneventful recovery and lived until October 8, 1905.

Logan and his wife Mary Gamble Crawford had two daughters who survived. The elder, Francis (Fanny) married attornery Cyrus Hall Scott. Their daughter Edna Scott was born in this house in 1887; in 1907 she married H. G. Kump and they started their family in a house on Scott Street in Elkins. The Kump family lived in this house in Beverly during 1924 and 1925, while their new house in Elkins was being built. One of Kump's daughters later lived in the house for several years, otherwise it has been rented out.

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H. G. Kump served as Governor of West Virginia from 1933 to 1937 and is known for getting West Virginia's tax codes, roads and schools into better shape during the worst of the Great Depression. His 1925 brick home at the corner of South Randolph and Route 33 in Elkins is on the National Register of Historic Places.

This two-story frame "I" house with back L has a stone foundation and basement walls. The facade has five bays and a one-story porch. The house was badly damaged by fire in 1996 and its future is uncertain.